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Surface Preparation

Surface Preparation (or Surface Prep for short) is the process of cleaning and readying surfaces for new coatings. Due to varying attributes and performance characteristics of the many coating types, surface preparation requirements can also be unique from project to project. As a result, it’s very important to always read the coating specification and all coating technical data sheets.

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Bronze Restoration on the USMC Memorial

In the late 1940s private funds helped launch the development and construction of the United States Marine Corps War Memorial near Arlington National Cemetery in Washington DC. The iconic flag raising over Iwo Jima was sculpted by Felix de Weldon then cast from plaster into bronze. The giant bronze pieces were assembled on site. In the nearly 70 years since the memorial was constructed, it’s never had a major restoration — until now.

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Dust Suppression for Abrasive Blasting

Dust is a notorious side effect of abrasive blasting. Blast nozzles introduce a tremendous amount of air to a small area, whipping small pieces of grit, many hundreds of miles per hour into a surface that may be very dirty. As abrasive media come into contact with a substrate, dust is created as the coating is removed, as the abrasive profiles the substrate, and as the abrasive shatters.

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Chrysotile (White Asbestos) Found in Coal Slag

Earlier in the month, it was discovered that a major producer of abrasive blasting media had been distributing coal slag contaminated with chrysotile, commonly known as white asbestos. Chrysotile is a known human carcinogen that can be extremely harmful when ingested or inhaled. Asbestos has been found to be a direct contributor to “chronic lung disease as well as lung and other cancers.” OSHA notes, “There is no safe level of asbestos exposure for any type of asbestos fiber.”

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Concrete Restoration at the Guggenheim Museum

After 50 years of exposure to the elements, the Frank Lloyd Wright-designed Guggenheim Museum on New York City’s 5th Avenue needed help.

The art museum’s exterior concrete rotunda wall, which corkscrews outward as the building gets taller, was beset by hundreds of cracks ranging from hairlines to those that exposed steel reinforcement bars buried in 5-inch-thick (12.7 cm) concrete. And that’s just what Guggenheim’s team of architects, engineers, and restoration experts could see! Who knew what else lie beneath 12 layers of coatings applied over the decades?

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Marble Restoration with Sponge-Jet

Marble Restoration is a task frequently faced by masonry and historic restoration contractors. Marble has been used in buildings and structures for millennia dating as far back as the ancient Greeks in the 7th century BCE. Marble mining remains a global industry with quarries spanning across six continents. As marble has been used for centuries as a building material, many buildings and structures around the world contain marble that is showing its age with discoloration and staining.

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Abrasive Blasting inside Cofferdams

Damage from corrosion is one of the largest threats to the safety and integrity of a ship. Without proper safeguards in the form of coatings, surface preparation, and cathodic protection, ships and boats of all sizes will eventually rust and deteriorate. While materials used to build ships vary, most types of metals corrode, especially in chloride-rich environments like sea water.

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Fire Damage Restoration of Wood Beams

According to the National Fire Protection Association, fire fighters responded to 1.35 Million fires in the United States last year. The cause of these fires vary from grease fires while cooking to electrical overload on dated wiring. Industrial and Commercial property owners lose billions of dollars every year due to fire damage, but the majority of properties that get damaged are not a total loss. Most surfaces that suffer fire and smoke damage including brick, stone, and wood can be cleaned using Sponge Media™.

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Silica Dust Suppression with Sponge-Jet

OSHA's Final Rule to protect workers from silica is now in effect. Companies that clean, restore, or prepare concrete and stone now have a greater job site responsibility related to respirable crystalline silica that becomes airborne during this process. In their Final Rule, OSHA has reduced the permissible exposure limit (PEL) for respirable crystalline silica to 50 micrograms per cubic meter of air, averaged over an 8-hour shift. To lower airborne silica created by construction processes, OSHA is requiring companies to add engineering controls to concrete, stone and other masonry cleaning and repair processes.

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Sponge-Jet Blast Room Integrations Continue, less KwietKave Sound-proof Blast Rooms

Sponge-Jet is phasing out modular sound-proof blast room and dust collectors which have previously been part of our KwietKave™ product line. Sponge-Jet will continue to offer all other stationary blasting, vacuuming, recycling and reloading solutions –now called Sponge-Jet Custom Integrations™replacing the KwietKave branding.

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